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JCSAT-17 & GEO-KOMPSAT 2B

This mission will launch two satellites: JCSAT-17 and GEO-KOMPSAT 2B.

JCSAT-17

Built by Lockheed Martin for SKY Perfect JSAT Group Japan, JCSAT-17 will be a geostationary telecommunications satellite dedicated to disaster relief efforts and high-volume communication events.

It was ordered on February 3, 2016, and the launch vehicle was chosen 11 months later on January 4, 2017.

The satellite has a planned 15 year operational life, and will communicate through S-band transponders with a flexible processor to allow for rapid redirect capability during natural disaster response operations.

The S-band of the communications spectrum is most commonly used in our everyday lives to weather radar, airport surveillance radar, and air traffic control.

NASA used the S-band to communicate with the Space Shuttles during launch and landing operations, and still uses part of the S-band to talk to the International Space Station.

GEO-KOMPSAT 2B

A South Korean meteorological satellite, GEO-KOMPSAT 2B is the twin of GEO-KOMPSAT 2A that was launched on an Ariane 5 rocket on December 4, 2018.

It will monitor Earth's oceans and perform environmental monitoring via the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager-II and Environmental monitor sensor payloads onboard.

The satellite will be stationed at the 128° East longitude location 35,786 km directly above Earth's equator.

GEO-KOMPSAT 2B has a mass of 3,200 kg and is built to last at least 10 years.

Image: GEO-KOMPSAT 2B from ESA

On this

rocket

Ariane 5

The Ariane 5 is the European Space Agency's (ESA's) heavy lift, workhorse launcher.

Built by Airbus Defence and Space, Ariane 5 is operated and its payload customers contracted via Arianespace.

The rocket carries a per launch price tag of approximately $168 million (USD), but offers ride shares for two large payloads at a time. The two payloads ride one on top of the other, the lower payload being the lighter weight one and the upper payload being the heavier of the two.

The upper payload customer pays about $101 million (USD) and the lower payload customer pays about $67 million (USD) - thus the price of an Ariane 5 is inline with other heavy lift launchers from a "what the customer pays" perspective.

Ariane 5 debuted on 4 June 1996 and has undergone five upgrades and variant changes over the years.

Of those five variants, one remains in operation: the Ariane 5 ECA (Evolution Cryotechnique type A).

Ariane 5 ECA stats

Height: 52 m / 171 ft
Diameter: 5.4 m / 18 ft
Mass: 777,000 kg (1,713,000 lb)
Stages: 3

First Stage - Solid Rocket Boosters & Core stage

Engines: 2 x Solid Rocket Boosters & 1 x Vulcain 2 (core stage)
Length: 31.6 m / 104 ft (boosters)
Diameter: 3.06 m / 10 ft (boosters)
Length: 23.8 m / 78 ft (core stage)
Diameter: 5.4 m / 18 ft (core stage)
Thrust (total at sealevel/liftoff): 3,400,000 lbf / 15,124 kN
Thrust (total in vacuum): 3,490,000 lbf / 15,524 kN
Booster Propellant: Perchlorate / aluminium / polybutadiene
Core Stage propellant: Liquid Oxygen / Liquid Hydrogen

Second Stage - Core Stage

Engines: 1 x Vulcain 2
Length: 23.8 m / 78 ft
Diameter: 5.4 m / 18 ft
Thrust: 310,000 lbf / 1,390 kN
Propellant: Liquid Oxygen / Liquid Hydrogen

Third Stage

Engines: 1 x HM7B
Length: 4.711 m / 15.46 ft
Diameter: 5.4 m / 18 ft
Thrust: 15,000 lbf / 67 kN
Propellant: Liquid Oxygen / Liquid Hydrogen

Payload Lift capability

Geostationary Orbit: 11,115 kg / 24,504 lb

From this

launch site

ELA-3 - Guiana Space Centre - Kourou, French Guiana
2020-02-18

ELA-3 (Ensemble de Lancement Ariane 3) is a launch pad built specially for the Ariane 5 rocket - the European Space Agency's (ESA's) and Arianespace's heavy-lift workhorse vehicle.

Built in the mid-1990s, it was first used on June 4, 1996 for the maiden launch of Ariane 5.

ELA-3 is located in the Guiana Space Centre (French: Centre Spatial Guyanais), a French and European spaceport located near Kourou in French Guiana near the northern tip of South America.

The space centre itself has been operational since 1968 and has hosted launches for the ESA, the French National Centre for Space Studies, and commercial companies Arianespace and Azercosmos.

A total of 9 different rocket types have launched from the Guiana Space Centre, including three active rockets and six retired vehicles.

The current rocket fleet at the space center is comprised of the Ariane 5 for heavy payloads, the Russian-provided Soyuz-STB for medium-mass payloads, and Vega for smaller mass payloads.

The Ariane 6, currently under development, will launch from CSG beginning in the early 2020s.

Here's where to view JCSAT-17 & GEO-KOMPSAT 2B

Viewing Sites
  • Guiana Space Museum
  • Plages des Roches beach
  • Place des Amandiers
  • Guiana Space Centre
Know Before You Go

ELA-3 (Ensemble de Lancement Ariane 3) is a launch pad built specially for the Ariane 5 rocket - the European Space Agency's (ESA's) and Arianespace's heavy-lift workhorse vehicle.

Built in the mid-1990s, it was first used on June 4, 1996 for the maiden launch of Ariane 5.

ELA-3 is located in the Guiana Space Centre (French: Centre Spatial Guyanais), a French and European spaceport located near Kourou in French Guiana near the northern tip of South America.

The space centre itself has been operational since 1968 and has hosted launches for the ESA, the French National Centre for Space Studies, and commercial companies Arianespace and Azercosmos.

A total of 9 different rocket types have launched from the Guiana Space Centre, including three active rockets and six retired vehicles.

The current rocket fleet at the space center is comprised of the Ariane 5 for heavy payloads, the Russian-provided Soyuz-STB for medium-mass payloads, and Vega for smaller mass payloads.

The Ariane 6, currently under development, will launch from CSG beginning in the early 2020s.

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